Myths about the coil


#1

There are a lot of myths about the coil. Here are some of them with explanations.

  1. You can only have a coil if you have had a baby.

WRONG - you can have a coil even if you have never been pregnant. Sometimes people who have had a baby through a vaginal delivery have had the entrance to their womb stretched and this makes it a little easier (and less painful) to fit a coil

  1. You can only have a coil if you are older or in a stable relationship

WRONG - you can have a coil at any age post puberty. Older people may be more likely to have had a pregnancy and a vaginal delivery - so it may be a bit easier to fit. If you are in a stable relationship your risk of sexually transmitted infections is lower (see below)

  1. Coils cause infections of the womb

WRONG - infections of the womb are usually caused by sexually transmitted bacteria such as chlamydia or gonorrhoea. If you have one of these infections at the entrance to the womb (where it may remain for many years without causing a problem) then the process of fitting the coil may transfer the infection into the womb itself. For this reason it can be a good idea to get a test for sexually transmitted infection before having your coil fitted.

Hope thats helpful. Do share any other myths that you know of.

Paula


#2

And what about the one that a coil can get ‘lost’ elsewhere inside your body? I have heard that one a few times. That is surely not possible, right?


#3

I’ve heard that coils can be pulled out by removing a tampon too quickly!


#4

Well I have also heard these stories that the rare woman who gets pregnant while using the coil end up having a baby with the coil stuck in the baby’s arm/leg/other body part. Also I can’t believe it can be true …but all these stories don’t help encourage women do they?!


#5

Hello@ Nikki

image

I’ve also heard that one - I guess it could happen - but if you look at the picture I have attached - the threads are only present in the top of the vagina and they are short - too short really to get embedded in a tampon - they are also made of nylon thread - a bit like fishing line - it doesn’t really stick to stuff.

Maybe if the coil had partially expelled so it was more present in the vagina then this might be possible?

Has this happened to anyone on the forum?

Paula


#6

Hello @Katrina

I agree - the coil is a really effective method of contraception and so pregnancy with a coil in place is really rare.

However, if pregnancy does occur then the clinical guidance is to try to remove the coil if at all possible and as early as possible.

This is because the small amount of evidence available suggests that there are many more problems with pregnancies if the coil is left in place including - spontanous abortion, premature delivery and infection. So rather than the baby being born with the coil attached to a body part, it is more likely that the pregnancy will be lost.

There is only a small amount of evidence as this is a very rare occurrence - but it is an important point to raise.

Many thanks

Paula